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U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA)

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Category: Science

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Three Things to Know about TUEs

It’s to be expected that athletes may experience medical conditions over the course of their sport careers, which may require that they use a medication or receive medical treatment. If the substance or method prescribed to treat that medical condition is prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), athletes can apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE), and if granted, obtain permission to use a prohibited substance or method for a specified time period.

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Tramadol: Why Some Athletes and Anti-Doping Experts Want It Banned

The opioid epidemic in the United States and around the world is not a secret, but how much do people really know about the abuse of prescription drugs in sport? Are they aware of how often seemingly innocent prescriptions for oxycodone or tramadol can turn into full-blown addictions? That the addiction can lead to an overdose and death? That it can happen to anyone, even athletes? Especially athletes?

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white pills on yellow background Substance profile Clomiphene

Substance Profile: What Athletes Need to Know about Clomiphene

As a part of competitive sport, many elite athletes must comply with the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, strict global standards that prohibit the use of certain substances and methods that can enhance performance and cause negative health effects. The WADA Prohibited List helps ensure that athletes can compete on a level playing field anywhere in the world.
To help athletes comply with the List, USADA provides a wide range of resources, including substance profiles, which include important information on high-risk substances like clomiphene.

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USADA Retests Samples for Unapproved and Abused Blood Booster

A new class of drugs, called HIF-stabilizing agents, mimic the natural response to hypoxia, or insufficient oxygen, and result in increased production of red blood cells (RBCs). While a number of related pharmaceutical products are being developed to assist in the treatment of legitimate diseases, such as anemia,…

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